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Monday, November 11, 2013

Book Update

I just updated the ebook at Amazon. I made changes which will, I hope, improve readability. There are just minor changes otherwise. It takes about 12 hours for the new version to be available; I understand that those who already own it should be able to get the updated version.

The book is available here.

ETA: There are spoilers in the comments below because the book covers all 7 seasons.

21 comments:

  1. In one episode Spike refers to himself as the "Big Bad" back in town. Did this term, along with "Little Bad," for various threats originate with the creators of the show or is it something the bolggers came up with and the creators incorporated it?

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    1. Good question. According to Wikipedia, the term originated on the show (BB&B or maybe Gingerbread), but I don't know if it was being used on line before that. Anyone else out there know?

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  2. After Buffy thwarts the Harvest in S1.E2, Angel watches the gang leave the Bronze. When he moves away a sign on the wall is revealed: Watch Your Step. Just an accidental prop or a more relevant meaning?

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    1. Heh, never noticed that. Could be either one.

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  3. At the end of the Harvest, s1.e2, Giles seems enthused as he explains that there are all kinds of demons and threats they are likely to face. Even says, “The fun is just beginning.” Could be sarcastic, but I think he is metaphorically telling them that the challenges of adulthood are exciting and something to look forward to?

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    1. I think that's a reasonable way to look at it. Giles probably would see things that way.

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    2. Especially, if Giles represents Buffy's intellectual self. Teens not only want to party, they want what they see as the privileges, freedom, and independence of adult life. So, the struggle with the dangers is justified by the benefits of the goal. Responsibility is the price of greater reward.

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    3. Yeah, if anything, Giles represents the exaggeration of the responsibility theme. Buffy resists that. Until she can't.

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  4. I appreciate your book’s illustration of how paying attention to details and every scene can often reveal humor, insights, and food for thought. While warning against imagining more than is really there. Very helpful.

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    1. Thanks. It's frequently hard to tell if background stuff is intentional or not. It's clear that a lot of thought went into the show, but some of it may be just the happy coincidence of the writer's brain. Even that's revealing and interesting.

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  5. Especially appreciate your insight that Buffy’s revelation to her mother that she is a Slayer is much like a child revealing to a parent that he or she is homosexual. I recognized something significant in the pronouncement, but could not put my finger on it. In the face of Joyce’s incredulity, I could not understand why Buffy did not demonstrate her physical strength.
    But that would have simply revealed an unusual ability – freakish even. Buffy was revealing something deeper: who she was psychologically. She marches to a different drummer, will lead an unusual life.
    This pronouncement could also be a metaphor for being a drug dealer or drug user or born again Christian or atheist, etc. But being gay, like being a Slayer, is a more fundamental aspect of personality, not something open to the influence of others. Buffy deserves to be recognized and embraced for who she is, for who she is choosing to become.
    Your book offers a number of important insights of this kind. Though I am not comfortable with Freudian interpretations in general, since I do not accept his view of human personality, I find your application to the metaphors useful food for thought.

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  6. " Buffy was revealing something deeper: who she was psychologically. She marches to a different drummer, will lead an unusual life."

    This is an excellent point and nicely phrased.

    I'm not a Freudian at all, but it seems clear that the writers drew on Freud and Jung for a lot of the themes.

    Thanks for the comments.

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  7. You reference transcripts and DVD interviews with Joss Whedon and others. Can you suggest an inexpensive way to obtain some of these? Buying the complete series would cost over $100. And I’m not sure that is where the interviews are anyway?
    I believe your discussion of his Existentialist views reveal a fundamental theme throughout the series.

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    1. I've collected transcripts of the DVD interviews from 2 places: ATPo (mostly transcribed by rahael), where you can search the archives; and the livejournal entries of stormwreath, which are available at http://stormwreath.livejournal.com/tag/buffy%20dvd%20commentary (lj required).

      I don't have transcripts of all of the DVD commentaries, not even all those by Joss. I've tried to find a collection, but my google-fu skills aren't up to it, and it's possible that no such collection exists. For the rest, I've had to listen to the commentaries and quote the important passages myself.

      I agree that Joss's existentialist views inform BtVS and his other shows too. It's his basic world view.

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    2. Thanks. I found the livejournal, but what is ATPo?

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    3. Sorry, All Things Philosophical on Buffy, etc. The archives are here: http://www.atpobtvs.com/existentialscoobies/archives.html

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    4. Thanks. I've seen most of Buffy in reruns, but just now taking a deeper interest. Didn't realize all of the Internet activity and devoted fan base. Certainly deserved.

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    5. There were lots of sites available when the show aired, but many of them shut down and there aren't any archives (at least not that I know of). ATPo has kept the archives up, and I think a few of the others have too. There are also sites where people review the show in retrospect, like The A.V. Club and tor.com. Spoilers abound, of course.

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  9. Hi, I just wanted to say that I just finished watching BtVS for the first time, reading along with the AV Club reviews and your comments. Now I'm looking forward to watching the series again with your book. Thanks so much for all the work you put into this.

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    1. Thank you! I know you'll like the second watch even better than the first (putting aside my book). The show really rewards in depth review.

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